Title of Resource
 

Craziest, Coolest, and Scariest Bluetooth Devices

Sara Kantor   Sara Kantor | 10.27.16 | Bluetooth

With Bluetooth and Bluetooth Low Energy becoming two of the leading Internet of Things protocols, lots of developers are putting in the work to create every kind of connected device imaginable. We already knew about the Bluetooth headphones, refrigerators, and rings, but what other kinds of devices have been Frankenstein-ed into connectivity?



Bluetooth MouthGuard

Do you grind your teeth at night? Do you want to know if you do? Your doctor may soon hand you a Bluetooth-connected mouthguard so that your phone can help track your sleep and grinding patterns.

Potential security issues:

Healthcare privacy issues are something we usually talk about when it comes to data transmission, but what if someone could measure your sleeping patterns, temperature, and other monitored data from a misconfigured device or app?



Bluetooth Pacifiers

Like the mouth guard for children, this Bluetooth pacifier lets you take your baby’s temperature, or make sure she’s sleeping, or otherwise ensure her health and security. It’s both convenient and a good way to keep track of patterns or aberrations in her health data.

Potential security issues:

I think this one’s more clearly a “privacy” issue than a “security” issue - and the privacy of your child is very important. Thinking of getting one of these? Make sure that everything is set up correctly, please.



Prosthetic Limbs

How much cooler could a device be than one that gives people who have lost a limb the ability to walk more easily? One of the biggest issues with standard prosthetics has been the ability to make the minute adjustments that allow for more normal walking. With Bluetooth sensors and a processor, however, the prosthetic can closer mimic a human leg and reduce the strain associated with using a prosthetic.

Potential security issues:

I almost feel bad pointing out security issues, as technologies like these can be transformative for their users. However, any type of connectivity opens up new vulnerabilities, and someone’s leg is a bad thing to be vulnerable.



FarmWizard

I was trying to avoid qualifying entire types of devices by a specific product name, but “FarmWizard” is just too great a name. The app uses Bluetooth LTE beacons on sheep or other livestock, allowing ranchers to track sales, sickness, death, and more when tracking their stock. A useful combination of small ID chips, a “Reader Stick,” and a phone to collect and transmit the information, the program is an intelligent way of being able to keep stock of, well, a farmer’s stock.

Potential security issues:

While the average farm isn’t all that connected, agriculture is a massive business and susceptible to the same threats as other large businesses, hacking included. Can you imagine the tax implications of a large number of sheep “dying”...?



Bluetooth Beanie

Because Bluetooth headsets weren’t convenient enough, hats are now being connected. You can “use the tiny controls in the beanie’s seam to control music and volume and accept phone calls using the built-in microphone and speakers without impacting your style.” My question: can you wash it?

Potential security issues:

Part of its advertising pitch is that it can communicate with your phone from up to 10 meters away. While this is very convenient, it does mean that if you lose the beanie, you’ve provided a way for other people to access your phone from up to 10 meters away...



Bluetooth Fork

This “smart fork” is supposed to encourage healthier eating by tracking speed of eating and vibrating when it senses that you’ve been eating too quickly. It allows you to see your eating habits in real time and also upload to a website which allows you to see patterns in your eating habits and weight over time.

Potential security issues:

You’re supposed to sync this fork with your scale and the website… is it configured to sync properly? What kind of information is being transmitted? You can pair it with your smartphone to see eating in real time?



Bluetooth Toilet

That’s right - a Bluetooth-connected toilet. Kohler suggests that you might want this toilet for its “personalized settings that let you fine-tune every option to your exact preferences, from ambient colored lighting to wireless Bluetooth®* music sync capability to the heated seat and foot warmer”

Potential security issues:

I’m not sure I can be serious for long enough to think of a security issue here, but I guess someone could steal your Spotify password if the configuration was set up improperly?



Cicret Arm Screen

With a wristband and screen, this Bluetooth device allows you to use your arm as a screen “like a tablet, but on your skin.” This is every bit as cool as it sounds (if it works, as they haven’t actually released the device yet).

Potential security issues:

This falls under the FitBit and headphone category of potential vulnerabilities. If it pairs with the wrong device, you might start getting some really questionable things broadcast onto your arm.



Bluetooth Kitchen Appliance

Toaster? Refrigerator? Smoker? Oven? There’s a pretty substantial number of Bluetooth-connected kitchen appliances, some more useful than others. After all, if BLE is part of the future of the IoT, of course there needs to be a Bluetooth-enabled toaster.

Potential security issues:

As with any physical device with Bluetooth connection, the answer is two-fold. Misconfigured devices, like this tea kettle, can reveal Wi-Fi passwords and other sensitive information. In addition, a remote-controlled oven in the wrong hands could prove to be very dangerous.

(Want to create your own? Reddit has the answers)



...And More

We’re not the first ones to compile a list of crazy Bluetooth devices, and we definitely won’t be the last (and yes, some of these lists are old):

Tags: Bluetooth

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